PD410 Portfolio Development

Course Description

The production of a photographer’s portfolio is an ongoing process of evaluation and reevaluation that should never be truly finished. Whether formatted digitally as a website or physically as a print book, a portfolio must at all times clearly and effectively reflect only the artist’s strongest work. This final course begins the process of focusing and defining each student’s creative identity by writing a biographical artist’s statement, then selecting, reviewing and refining a collection of images both for print and the web that best define his or her current creative ability and professional ambition. Working together as a class, in private meetings with a program director and through focused individual effort, students will learn how to define and present their distinctive vision to their chosen markets. Please note: Portfolio Development also requires the selection, approval and preparation of final prints and images for Graduation Gallery Show and media.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • The importance of editing and constant reevaluation
  • Refining the portfolio and website based on individual strengths and area of interest
  • Portfolio defined, print and web (show examples)
  • Traditional print portfolios
  • Current digitally-produced portfolios, print and electronic
  • Generating “buzz”
  • Design and branding
  • Portfolio Resources
  • Website Resources
  • The artist’s statement
  • Making a first portfolio edit
  • Refining website portfolios
  • Preparing for a portfolio review
  • Individual reviews with instructor begin
  • Printing for portfolio
  • Value of printing portfolio in spreads vs single images
  • Designing portfolio spreads in Photoshop
  • Printing portfolio spreads from Photoshop

PD400 Critical Skills

Course Description

Positioned near the midpoint of the program, this course tests and reviews students‘ comprehension of previous program topics. Students will work independently off-campus to complete a complex photographic assignment, on deadline, designed to stimulate both creative and technical problem solving. A detailed critique of the assignment will allow the instructor to evaluate each student’s critical skillset, identify problem areas needing further attention, and assign tutoring or extra work as needed.

The course concludes with each student’s commitment to a photographic project focusing on an area of personal interest, which will be presented as a deliverable during the Portfolio courses at the end of the program.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Lightroom Catalog in order/Library course
  • Lightroom Develop Course
  • Round Tripping from Lightroom to Photoshop
  • Selection Tools in Photoshop-Quick Selection Tool, Pen Tool, Channel Masking, Color Range, Paint Brush
  • Refining Selections
  • Adjustment Layers: Curves, Levels, Hue Saturation, Selective Color, B&W, gradient
  • Difference between Pixel and Adjustment Layer
  • Pixel Editor Vs. Metadata: what is the difference and what are the strengths and weaknesses of each
  • DSLR Function
  • Reciprocity
  • Studio Lighting
  • Fundamentals of Composition
  • Quality of Light
  • Color Temperature
  • Blending Modes
  • Bit Depth
  • Color Space
  • Basics of Color Correction
  • Studio Safety and best Practices
  • Working with others

PP320 Story Building

Course Description

In this course students will apply the skills learned in the previous courses to capture and edit a 3-6 minute original multimedia piece incorporating stills, audio, and video components using Final Cut Pro.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Coherent and engaging storytelling using photography and audio
  • Professional Quality photography and audio recording
  • Proficient use of Final Cut Pro
  • Using still and moving images along with a soundtrack to tell a coherent, interesting, moving story

PP310 Visual Journalism

Course Description

A photograph can decorate a wall or it can have the power to shake the world. It is a picture’s ability to tell a story that makes photography a potent force in our lives. But if a single picture is worth a thousand words, a series of carefully crafted images leading the viewer through a narrative journey may be worth volumes. In this course students will create a compelling photographic story by editing and sequencing multiple still images.

After preliminary approval of story proposals, timetable and budgets, students will explore the elements of story telling: idea generation, shooting, editing, documentation and presentation. Students will also concentrate on collecting additional assets for inclusion in their final Multimedia story project for Storybuilding 2, including audio, narration, and supplemental or transitional images.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Planning shoots
  • Visualizing the final product
  • Creating a shot list
  • Securing access to subjects and locations
  • Approved proposal
  • Approximately 2-3 weeks prior to the first class session, the instructor will contact each student and request a proposal for a story to be completed during the course
  • The instructor will review, refine and approve student proposals in writing prior to the start of the course
  • Shooting story content
  • Students will shoot story content independently during course sessions
  • Multimedia content
  • Instructors must advise and assist students in collection of additional photographic, video and audio assets to be used in final multimedia story project for Storybuilding

PP300 Multimedia Tools for Photographers

Course Description

In this course students will learn how to use Final Cut Pro to build multimedia projects that contain still images, as well as recorded audio and music. Students will also learn audio recording and room toning skills that will help them to obtain good quality audio when interviewing a subject. The class will conclude with each student delivering a multimedia project using assets given to them by the instructor, as well as images of their own (optional).

This section of the program is broken down into three topic areas. The first focuses on learning Final Cut Pro, the second on storytelling and allocates time for media collection, and last is an editing lab, where students will edit their photos and audio into a 3-6 minute multimedia piece.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Audio recording and room toning
  • Export from Lightroom for Final Cut Pro, and why certain frame sizes are used
  • Final Cut Pro High Definition Sequence Setting, and why it is used
  • Final Cut Pro picture and audio editing proficiency
  • Proficiency with the “Ken Burns” (Pan and Zoom) Effect
  • Export for DVD and H.264 Quicktime delivery using the “Share” menu

PP290 Audio Recording for Photographers

Course Description

This course expands on DSLR video production and introduces enhanced audio recording technique as perhaps the most critical component of a successful multimedia video project. Beginning with the basic skills required to produce an effective “radio interview”, students will explore the process of professionally capturing ambient sound, music and the spoken word using small multi-channel digital recorders with and without supplemental microphones.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Learn how to use a digital audio Recorder
  • Learn to prepare a location for sound isolation
  • Learn to problem-solve on location
  • Capture ambient Sound

PP280 DSLR Video for Photographers

Course Description

Driven in part by the rapid development of DSLR cameras incorporating high definition video capabilities, the convergence of still photography and filmmaking has created a profound shift in the nature of both media. For still photographers especially, the integration of movement and sound into our work has become a crucial (and highly marketable) skill. From planning the shoot by storyboarding, through sequencing the shooting schedule, advanced lighting (including “motivated” lighting with continuous supplemental light sources), dynamic focusing and exposure, directing subjects and crew, and tracking movement through the frame, students will begin to master the fundamental aspects of video production using the same small, portable and highly flexible DSLR cameras they already own.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Use basic controls of the their DSLR to shoot a video interview
  • Operate focus, focal length and iris controls of camera
  • Follow a simple lighting plan for a video interview
  • Understand utility and uses of a video monitor
  • Understand utility and uses of in-camera exposure tools
  • Use a basic field sound mic and boom for a video interview
  • Understand concept of a linear signal chain for sound trouble-shooting
  • Reproduce simple shooting plan for Interview
  • Define and execute simple B-roll materials
  • Begin process of acquiring analytic tools for reviewing footage

PP270 Wedding Photography

Course Description

This course will illustrate photographic concepts needed to successfully photograph a modern wedding. Topics will range across lighting, posing, and photographic styles, and will address current trends and traditions addressing the complexities and challenges of photographing weddings. Students will learn to create a personal brand and signature for their work, and to successfully market and network their business. The class will address how to work with brides and appeal to current trends in the industry, and how to set yourself apart. The curriculum will also address booking weddings, initial consultations, contracts, pricing, and client relationships that will grow and nurture a new wedding business.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Case Studies of Prominent Wedding Photographers
  • Visual Shot List
  • The typical wedding day. Preparing for Wedding Day
  • Wedding photography equipment
  • Working with assistants
  • Care of memory cards on the job
  • Organization
  • People Skills
  • Responsibilities of the wedding photographer
  • General Lighting discussion, challenges of using mixed and available lighting
  • Time constraints
  • Professionalism
  • Research
  • Current trends in the wedding industry
  • How to find your target market through other vendors-Florists, Venues, Wedding Planners, etc.
  • Feminine Posing for a formal gown
  • Masculine Posing
  • Couple Posing
  • Engagement Portraiture
  • Formal chair posing for groups
  • Informal Group Techniques
  • Etiquette for group posing
  • Lighting Groups
  • Background control
  • Using Window Light
  • Using Video Light
  • Using speedlights
  • Dealing with Mixed lighting
  • Wedding Post Production
  • Using actions in Photoshop
  • Business and Financial Overview for Wedding Photographers

PP260 Photo Illustration

Course Description

Commercial and editorial photographers must often move beyond simply capturing “found” images and instead pre-visualize, design and produce complex visual constructions limited only by their imagination. By combining an extensive knowledge of camera, lighting and Photoshop skills learned in previous course, students will conceptualize an image that displays the attitude, lifestyle or message needed to sell a product or promote an idea. Studio and location shooting and advanced Photoshop compositing techniques are equally emphasized, and students are encouraged to ignore conventional constraints and challenge themselves to create compelling, convincing and confounding photographic illustrations.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Understand the process of conceptualizing an image: brainstorming on a topic and thinking visually
  • Advanced skills for compositing in Photoshop
  • Creating credible, photorealistic shadows in Photoshop
  • Matching light between separate images
  • Attributes of light: Quality and Color
  • Pre-production, thinking of everything necessary to create a composite images

PP250 Photo Markets and Business

Course Description

This Photography class will address the skills necessary to create powerful environmental portraits for corporate, editorial, and advertising clients, as well as the retail portrait market. Assignments will focus on using the location or environment to help convey a narrative about the subject. The course will address obstacles and other professional considerations (scouting, scheduling, planning, equipment) needed to create a successful environmental portrait in a multitude of situations.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Correctly pose male and female subjects using the surrounding location to lead to or frame the subject, tell a story, enhance the subject, and add visual interest to your portraiture.
  • Handle a wide variety of lighting situations including natural light, outdoor light, open shade, window light, available room lighting, one and two light strobe set ups, mixed lighting, and strobe outdoors.
  • Choose appropriate lenses for each situation to achieve the desired effect in the portrait.
  • Manage and control backgrounds with light, depth of field, lens choice, and exposure to enhance the subject in the portrait.
  • Begin to create images that appeal to a retail portrait audience.
  • Understand that all elements are important in a composition
  • Integrate location and subject to create meaningful portraiture

PP240 Working with Models

Course Description

Commercial, fashion and editorial photographers rely on professional models to provide the dynamic, compelling presence vital to the success of their projects. This exciting course demonstrates how the successful photographer/model collaboration works. Using agency-supplied models, students will develop concepts, practice sophisticated lighting and shooting techniques, deconstruct and emulate inspiring images from published tear sheets, and learn how to direct talent and crew. Comprehensive classroom discussions cover casting, preproduction, pre-light, editing, postproduction and delivery.

This Photography class draws on each student’s sense of visual perception, interpersonal skills, portrait lighting techniques, and facility with equipment, lighting, lenses and advanced postproduction processes. Students will show their work in a group review where the rules of editing will be discussed. Beauty retouching includes treatment of skin, softening, selective sharpening, treatment of eyes, teeth and hair, blending and masking to optimize facial features. Students will refine their printing skills using the images from the previous week’s shoots. Students will print and deliver portfolio-quality images for each model photographed suitable for promotion by their agency.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • 10 steps to producing a shoot with models
  • Studio technique
  • Set management and safety
  • Cosmetics, finesse, interval of movement, produced imagery of face, references to apparel, studio etiquette, respecting the other the shooter’s time and concentration, model protocol
  • Lighting patterns, dialogue during directing, timing, staying connected with the model, mood and moment
  • Shooting beauty
  • Attention to beauty details, head shots and make-up and hair, including props
  • The digital shooting process – Shoot and evaluate, re-shoot and re-evaluate
  • Shooting full length
  • Apparel
  • Posing
  • Lighting
  • Set/background
  • Shooting motion
  • Models moving, model jumping, camera moving, blurs, shutter drags, use of fan to create motion, etc.
  • How to review work from the point of view of agency requirements.
  • Model agency standards and expectations.
  • How creative to get, how commercial to keep it.
  • What to fix and what to leave alone
  • Commercial positioning of the model in their market, model recognition, photographic style, and the acceptable degree of retouch necessary.
  • Ethics and professional standards of retouching are discussed – Examples are shown.
  • How to make a critical edit
  • Establishing a retouching strategy
  • Remove, reduce, light dynamics, skin, hair, eyes, teeth etc
  • Efficiency of layer use to keep file small
  • Photoshop techniques appropriate for each image.
  • Cosmetic details, hand positions, eye positions, treatments neck wrinkles, and hair and make-up.
  • Skin texture, pore patterns, skin softening, eye lash treatments, eye veins, all other aberrations and distractions that can require treatment in post production.
  • Tools most commonly used for beauty retouching heal brush, clone stamp, patch tool for skin, masking for depth of lines and wrinkles
  • Adjustment layers for light adjustments, lightening and darkening applied to teeth, eyes, hair (roots and highlights)
  • Retouching eyes
  • Brightening, iris color, highlight placement, catch light fabrication.
  • Softening and sharpening
  • Demonstration of softening filter, PS sharpening filters, High Pass sharpening and softening.
  • Liquify Tool
  • Professional quality printing for models’ portfolios

PP230 Location Portrait Photography

Course Description

This Photography class will address the skills necessary to create powerful environmental portraits for corporate, editorial, and advertising clients, as well as the retail portrait market. Assignments will focus on using the location or environment to help convey a narrative about the subject. The course will address obstacles and other professional considerations (scouting, scheduling, planning, equipment) needed to create a successful environmental portrait in a multitude of situations.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Correctly pose male and female subjects using the surrounding location to lead to or frame the subject, tell a story, enhance the subject, and add visual interest to your portraiture.
  • Handle a wide variety of lighting situations including natural light, outdoor light, open shade, window light, available room lighting, one and two light strobe set ups, mixed lighting, and strobe outdoors.
  • Choose appropriate lenses for each situation to achieve the desired effect in the portrait.
  • Manage and control backgrounds with light, depth of field, lens choice, and exposure to enhance the subject in the portrait.
  • Begin to create images that appeal to a retail portrait audience.
  • Understand that all elements are important in a composition
  • Integrate location and subject to create meaningful portraiture

PP220 Portable Lighting with Speedlights

Course Description

In the words of photojournalist Joe McNally, a speedlight is just like any other form of available light- “if it’s in your camera bag, it’s available.” Today’s small, camera-mounted flash units made by both Canon and Nikon pack a lot of power and advanced electronic versatility, but they also provide an important opportunity to supplement, shape and enhance the quality as well as the quantity of light in almost any photograph imaginable.

This Photography class introduces the speedlight first as a manually-operated device not unlike larger professional lighting tools, but then quickly shifts to TTL and balanced flash exposure, remote off-camera triggering and multiple light setups. A variety of light modifiers and wireless triggering systems will also be demonstrated and available for student use. Deliverables for the Photography certificate course emphasize speedlights as invaluable tools for portrait, commercial location and event photographers.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Emphasis on Nikon and Canon speedlight systems
  • Review exposure concepts related to flash
  • Exposure variables (volume of light, ISO, aperture, shutter speed)
  • Flash-specific exposure concepts
  • Synch speed
  • Balanced ambient-flash exposure
  • Speedlight exposure modes and methods: M. A, TTL
  • Exposure Compensation; on camera and on speedlight
  • Comparison between studio flash unit (Prophoto. etc) and speedlight using M exposure mode
  • Button-pushing: configuring Nikon and Canon speedlights for manual operation
  • Indirect (bounced) manual speedlight function
  • Light painting with single and multiple manual flash units fired during bulb exposure
  • TTL Flash photography
  • How TTL speedlight works with ambient exposure meter in camera
  • TTL speedlights for event photography
  • Button pushing: configuring Nikon and Canon speedlights for TTL operation
  • Front/rear curtain synch
  • High speed synch
  • Stroboscopic effects with repeating flash
  • Light modifiers and grip equipment for speedlights
  • Methods of synchronizing remote speedlights
  • TTL flash cable
  • Nikon/Canon master/remote infrared
  • Pocket Wizard
  • Radio remote control
  • Radio Popper
  • Optical slaves
  • Synch cord
  • Single and multiple remote speedlights, infrared triggering and a simple translucent white umbrella

PP210 Studio Portrait Photography

Course Description

“A portrait! What could be more simple and more complex, more obvious and more profound?” Since Baudelaire’s exclamation in 1859, portrait photography’s contribution to both the record of modern civilization and the memories of generations of families has been profound indeed. In fact, most people’s interaction with the world of professional photography begins and ends with the neighborhood portrait photographer.

This Photography class introduces traditional portrait photography techniques as practiced within a controlled studio environment. After an examination of the aesthetics, tools and methodologies of the studio portrait photographer, hands-on exercises and assignments will help reinforce the skills required to master this essential aspect of professional photography. From the simplicity of window light portraiture through the flexibility of the standard 4-light setup, students will gain a thorough understanding of the dramatic and cosmetic potential of a variety lighting schemes and posing techniques.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Contrasts between traditional and contemporary studio portrait photography
  • The business of retail portrait photography
  • Tools of the Trade
  • Traditional male and female posing techniques
  • Light: Direction, Quality and Color
  • Window light portraiture
  • Recognizing flattering qualities and patterns of light even while restricted by a fixed light source
  • Portrait Studio set-up
  • Standard 4-light portraiture
  • “Cosmetic” Lighting- Traditional Key and Fill Light positions (Short Light, Broad Light, Rembrandt Light, Butterfly Light, Edge Light)
  • Portrait lighting considerations and best practices

PP200 Photographing Architectural Interiors

Course Description

Photographers who specialize in documenting both interior and exterior environments for architects, interior designers and realtors face two fundamental challenges: composition and lighting. In this Photography certificate module, students will first learn how to establish the perfect camera position before facing the creative and technical hurdles of balancing mixed light sources, adding supplemental light, and using advanced techniques to extend the camera’s ability to record highlight and shadow detail. Shooting and post-production assignments will demonstrate when and how to supplement effective lighting skills with Photoshop and HDR technology.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

Perspective, focus and distortion control

  • Guidelines for Architectural Photography
  • Establish camera position
  • Identify dominant light source
  • Determine the need for additional lighting and strategy for balancing mixed light sources
  • Aesthetic considerations (props, composition, etc)
  • Emphasis on details, surfaces and materials
  • Safe, sensible location workflow
  • Method of digital capture (“live” lighting and/or shoot separate elements and digital perspective control)
  • Equipment and lighting overview
  • Camera
  • Wide-angle lens (at least 28mm equivalent)
  • Sturdy tripod
  • Profoto monokit
  • Hot lights
  • Speedlights
  • Modifiers and gels
  • Additional equipment
  • Advantages/limitations of the view camera
  • Advantages/limitations of tilt/shift lenses
  • “Transform perspective/warp” in Photoshop
  • Lens Correction filter in Photoshop
  • Software and process overview
  • RAW versioning and critical development
  • Synchronizing RAW development settings
  • Configuring camera for 7-stop auto bracket
  • Masked and blended exposures in Photoshop
  • HDR processing in Photomatix Pro from Lightroom

PP190 Integrating Photoshop into the Creative Studio

Course Description

One of the most exciting aspects of digital photography is the immediate access to the post-production processes required to solve technical challenges or to realize a creative vision. Photographers no longer need to surrender control to retouchers, compositors or lab technicians – we now can do it all ourselves, often right on the set as we are capturing images. A solid understanding of both the nuances of studio lighting and the layering, selecting, masking and blending methods available in Photoshop is a powerful combination indeed. This Photography class introduces and explores how deliberate and precise lighting and post-production techniques used in tandem result in a far more controlled, efficient and creative imaging workflow.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Separating a photo shoot into different capture variations to solve problems
  • Combining different photographic content using layers and layer masks
  • Studio lighting techniques/best practices
  • —Flexible set construction
  • —Shooting for “silhouette”
  • —Light modifiers/reflectors
  • —Edge/reflection control
  • —Precise, “surgical” lighting (i.e. 2×2 softboxes/grids in place of 3×4 softbox for product work, etc.)
  • Relevant Lightroom/Photoshop topics
  • —RAW versioning to optimize dynamic range
  • —Selections, Masks, Layers
  • —Pen Tool
  • —Combine layers using ‘Blend-If’ mode
  • —Alternate blending methods
  • Masking and Blending exercises
  • —Controlling reflections
  • —Controlling light source reflections
  • —Split shooting using mixed light sources to enhance shape and texture
  • —Split shooting using exposure variations to enhance dynamic range
  • —Combining multiple split shooting approaches
  • Basic compositing exercises
  • —Analyzing image content
  • —Edge quality
  • —Matching perspective
  • —Light direction, color and character
  • —Shadows

PP180 Product and Still Life Studio Lighting

Course Description

Building on the basic studio and lighting skills learned during the previous Photography certification class: Introduction to Light, this course provides advanced training in product and still-life studio lighting with an emphasis on commercial practice and methodologies. Students will learn to critically control exposure, contrast, light quality and mood through the use of various light modifiers, reflectors and diffusers. Daily exercises and shooting assignments will demonstrate techniques for lighting textural, transparent/translucent and highly reflective objects. In the first week, emphasis in this course will be on developing a proficiency and comfort level working in the studio, using tethered digital capture processes, working with tabletop sets and still life product lighting techniques.

In the second part, this Photography class simulates a typical creative collaboration through a variety of design-oriented projects. The working relationship between a photographer and an art director is a crucial contributor to the successful outcome of any commercial or advertising assignment. Product and still life shooters must be sensitive to designers’ creative and production problems while also proactively participating in their solution. Camera and lighting skills introduced in previous courses will be tested and refined, as will students’ abilities to work with creative direction under production deadline pressures. Students will leave this exciting class with unique, professional quality portfolio pieces.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Studio safety best practices and protocols
  • Studio vs. Location conceptual mind-set and approaches
  • Advantages and setup of tethered capture workflow
  • Setup of Canon and Nikon tethered capture
  • Identify fundamental studio equipment and tools
  • Review Profoto packs and head
  • Review Grip equipment
  • Importance of tripod or camera stand
  • Manual focus
  • Review exposure for flash
  • Flash exposure controlled by aperture
  • Flash exposure controlled by power output
  • Shutter speed and flash synchronization
  • Shutter speed and mixed light exposure
  • Lighting quality
  • Hard vs Soft light
  • Light modifiers
  • Lighting ratios/contrast
  • Key Light/Fill light relationship
  • Working with mixed light (tungsten/strobe) and gelled light scenarios
  • Demonstrate the interaction of multiple lights on set
  • Shooting for texture (multiple lights)
  • Shooting highly reflective objects (multiple lights)
  • Shooting glassware (multiple lights)
  • Black line / white line
  • Adding complexity to shots by introducing backgrounds, props, pours, splashes, etc.
  • Choosing alternative background/surface material
  • Creating finished still life compositions
  • Basic and advanced product photography lighting and set building techniques
  • Shooting for silhouette and compositing: edge control and background considerations
  • The Creative Collaboration: 1 + 1 = 3
  • Understanding the photographer’s role in commercial and advertising projects
  • How to review design layouts
  • How to turn a designer’s concept into effective imagery
  • How to shoot to a layout
  • Questions to ask to clarify vague, uncertain, or contradictory creative direction
  • Relationship between Time, Budget, and Scope of Work- (how much can be accomplished with the time and resources allotted?)
  • Shooting Projects (collaborations with design students subject to availability)
  • Poster project (with Graphic Design students)
  • Cookbook project (with Graphic Design students)
  • Catalog project (directed by Photo instructor)

PP170 Practical Applications of Photoshop

Course Description

This Photography class explores more in-depth use of masks on adjustment layers and introduces masking on multiple pixel-based layers with an image. Emphasis will be placed on refining selections and creating more accurate masks through the use of channels. Other advanced retouching tools and techniques and new methods on using selective color correction will be introduced and all will be put to use in creating prints from Epson printers.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Making use of the right tool for making a selection
  • When to clone, heal or patch and why
  • Refine selections
  • Using image info to assist in directional enhancements
  • Begin to think about how to blend local enhancements further
  • How and when to sharpen an image
  • Use of making vector paths with the pen tool
  • Correcting for lens distortions in photoshop
  • Conversions to BW
  • The difference of bit depth
  • Why adjustment layers are better

PP160 Photographic Seeing

Course Description

Edward Weston described composition as “the strongest way of seeing”. Ansel Adams proclaimed that “there is nothing worse than a sharp picture of a fuzzy concept.” Between the two of them they identified and offered solutions to what are often a photographer’s most serious creative challenges— how do we bring visual order to a chaotic world, and how do we make interesting, meaningful photographs that transcend “the thing itself”. With all of the overwhelming technological options available to photographers in the digital era, we sometimes forget that making a good picture still starts with seeing and thinking clearly. Our goal should not be to make images of things so much as to make images about things. Composition is not an end in itself but simply a set of skills used to organize visual information. Through classroom discussion, challenging assignments and extensive location shooting both individually and as a group, this Photography class will stress the importance of concept and composition in the creation of compelling imagery.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • How and why a photographer must learn to see the world the way a camera does
  • Composition=Order
  • How painting and drawing are inclusive processes while photography and sculpture are exclusive
  • The difference between making pictures of and making pictures about
  • How to see like the camera sees
  • Switching between the left (logical) side of the brain to the right (intuitive) side of the brain (and back again)
  • How street photographers make extraordinary images of ordinary situations
  • How to use your camera instinctively, intuitively, and unobtrusively.
  • Lessons learned from the different approaches of photographers like Erwitt, Frank, Winogrand, Friedlander and Cartier-Bresson
  • How master photographers Henri-Cartier-Bresson and Garry Winogrand described their working methods
  • How Duane Michals used sequences of pictures and words to illustrate life’s Big Questions
  • Legal and social concerns every contemporary photographer should be aware of
  • When and how to use model and property releases
  • How copyright law applies to private and intellectual property
  • Effectively explore the urban and natural natural landscape with a camera
  • Demonstrate the effects of focal length, depth of field and exposure on rendering highly detailed objects and surfaces
  • Determine what to include and what to exclude in complex scenes
  • Understand and demonstrate the effect of camera position and focal length on the relationship between foreground and background
  • Use the spatial context of the viewfinder frame and its borders to influence what is arranged within (refer to chapter 1)
  • Bring visual order to chaotic scenes using Design Basics
  • Recognize and utilize Graphic and Photographic Elements combined with an understanding of how humans perceive tone, color and focus

PP150 Introduction to Light

Course Description

In this Photography certification module students will apply the technical concepts of ambient and flash exposure learned in Camera and Workflow to a series of daily lighting exercises. Working outside and in the studio, we will learn to recognize and reproduce hard and soft light using natural (existing) light, incandescant “hot” light, and professional studio strobe equipment. Emphasis will be placed on how light defines the design elements of shape, form, texture and tone, and how contrast control (or lighting ratio) determine the mood and impact of a photograph. Finally, using a single light source and simple light modifiers, each student will create a complex, powerfully lit conceptual studio photograph.

Learning Outcomes/Topics

  • Exposure, reciprocity, metering, interpreting histogram data, exposure modes and white balance
  • Location of primary camera controls
  • Identifying hard and soft natural light qualities
  • Moving subject, camera and background relative to a fixed light source
  • Modifying natural light with reflectors and diffusers
  • Color and contrast control for various natural light conditions
  • Use of reflectors and diffusers to modify and redirect natural light
  • Simple window light portraiture
  • Working safely in the studio
  • Primary rule of lighting: Angle of Incidence = Angle of Reflection
  • The Design Elements — Shape, Form, Texture
  • Contrast control using simple modifiers
  • Using the C stand, grid spot, and diffusion panel (scrim)
  • Lighting with a single continuous (hot) light (Arri 2K, Prophoto modeling light)
  • Simulating sunlight and window light in the studio; working with a fixed light source in the studio
  • Manual flash exposure
  • The Prophoto Studio Strobe pack and head
  • Pocketwizard Radio trigger
  • Lighting with a single studio strobe head